Farmers are increasingly being forced out of business by what they state would be the unjust techniques of major supermarkets. Photograph David Sillitoe for the Guardian

Farmers are increasingly being forced out of business by what they state would be the unjust techniques of major supermarkets. Photograph David Sillitoe for the Guardian

You can ch se a punnet up of Uk raspberries – at their best on the weekend – for a two-for-one offer in many supermarkets.

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But as shoppers reach for that quintessential summer treat, they need to perhaps ponder the fact that it is the farmer, perhaps not the supermarket, who’s spending money on the substantial discount.

The farmer could well be making no profit at all, without any choice into the pricing and little if any basic concept, as he picked and shipped the raspberries, just how much he would get for them. Or that the packaging will be taken care of by the farm, but done by an ongoing business opted for by the supermarket – at up to twice the price of it being packaged separately.

Farmers don’t speak about these specific things

Many of them, during a month-long research, told the Observer that the downturn they dare not risk irritating the big processors and stores. There’s a « climate of fear » – the nationwide Farmers Union’s phrase – in the monopolistic realm of contemporary f d shopping small manufacturers are way t frightened to speak out concerning the abuses which are impoverishing them simply because they risk « reprisals », which might suggest losing the only clients you will find. Very few felt able to speak to us regarding the record.

Henry Dobell operates a g d fresh fruit farm near Stowmarket in Suffolk. He has given up raspberries and now offers heritage apples from their 300-tree orchard, but only to regional stores as the relationship utilizing the supermarkets became « impossible ». Their needs saw their costs rise vietnam cupid login by 30% and no profit was being made by him. Read more…